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24 results for "Muda"

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  • Is there “mudagement” in your organization?

    "Mudagement." What a strange word. But to Tony Lamberton, the concept behind that word has made all the difference in identifying invisible waste in his organization - and by extension, eliminating it through targeted coaching. I recently sat down with Tony to learn more about the concept of muda...

    Tags: coaching, Lean Management, management system, Mura, Muda, Muri, Waste, Mudagement

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  • What Is This Takt Time You Speak About?

    When I first started learning about Lean, one of the terms I seemed to have difficulty wrapping my brain around was "takt time."Or, maybe it was getting straight the difference between takt time, cycle time, lead time, process time, value creating time, non-value creating time and all of the othe...

    Tags: A3 Thinking, Cycle time, Kaizen, Muda, Takt time, variability

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  • Flow (One Piece Flow)

    In a Lean manufacturing setting, products are ideally “pulled” through the value stream, one piece at a time, continually. There might be times when batches greater than one are necessary. But, the goal with Lean is to find ways to reduce batch sizes in a way that improves flow withou...

    Tags: Flow, Just In Time (JIT), Kanban, Muda, Pull, Standardized Work, Value, Value Streams, Waste

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  • Waste (Muda)

    In Japanese, the word for waste is muda. Any time, activity or resources that do not add value can be considered waste. Traditionally, there are seven forms of muda. However, many Lean practitioners have added an eighth, in recent years.  The “waste of talent” or the “waste...

    Tags: Muda, Waste

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  • Respect for People: Lean’s Forgotten Third Pillar?

    We often speak about the two pillars of the Toyota or Lean system, and when doing so we think of the two well-known pillars of just-in-time (JIT) and built-in quality (jidoka). JIT thereby focuses on manufacturing only the necessary products, at the necessary time, in the necessary quantity by de...

    Tags: Lean Leadership and Culture, Autonomy, Continual Improvement, Culture, Kaizen, Leadership, Lean, Lean Temple, Muda, Respect, Safety, Teamwork, Transformation, Waste

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  • Sorry, but Lean is about Cost Reduction

    It seems to be popular these last years and more recently to explicitly state that Lean is not (only) about cost reduction or cost cutting. See the recent posts by Mark Graban or Matt Hrivnak. So let me be somewhat controversial in this post (which I think is allowed to spark the discus...

    Tags: Continual Improvement (Kaizen), Lean Leadership and Culture, Cost reduction, Lean, Muda, Waste

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  • Respect for People: Lean’s Forgotten Third Pillar?

    We often speak about the two pillars of the Toyota or Lean system, and when doing so we think of the two well-known pillars of just-in-time (JIT) and built-in quality (jidoka). JIT thereby focuses on manufacturing only the necessary products, at the necessary time, in the necessary quantity by de...

    Tags: Autonomy, Continual Improvement, Culture, kaizen, Leadership, Lean Temple, Muda, respect, teamwork, transformation, waste

    Last updated

  • Muda Corporation: Improving Your Suggestions System

    Anyone who's had to implement a suggestions system in their organization knows it's not an easy task, especially from a cultural aspect. Marius Gil may have just the tool to help - a fun illustration featuring eight common, suggestion-suppressing behaviors to watch out for. (...)   Orig...

    Tags: Engagement, Muda, Mura, Muri, waste, visual management

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  • From Obeya to wallpaper show room

    When visual management turns into useless wallpaper Having an Obeya is the latest – fashionable – sign an organization takes Lean seriously. The name itself sounds performing as is it is so strongly related to Lean. Obeya may sound both exotic and performing, but is nothing more tha...

    Tags: Lean Management, Management, leadership and change, Lean, Muda, Mura, Muri, obeya, waste

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  • The fallacy of bottom-up Lean initiatives – Part 1

    Yes, Lean initiatives can be started bottom-up, but I doubt they’ll get very far and last for long. Here is why. Bottom-up Lean initiatives, e.i. improvements, are opportunities for improvement found by shopfloor people, line leaders or shop management. “Improvement” is most of...

    Tags: Lean Management, Management, leadership and change, kaizen event, Lean, Muda, Value Stream Mapping, waste

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