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by LSSU Admin - Monday, 28 September 2020, 9:38 PM
Retrieved from: The Lean Insider
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In August, Sean Ryan published his first book entitled Get in Gear: The Seven Gears that Drive Strategy to Results, which helps business leaders convert business strategy to measurable results. When I spoke with Sean this month, I asked him: “Why do organizations rarely get it right when it comes to achieving the expected results from their strategic planning?” Here is his complete answer:

It’s well documented that 75% to 90% of organizations fall short of achieving the results they expect from their strategies. Sometimes, it really is just a matter of a bad strategy regardless of how well it’s executed. Maybe it’s a bad acquisition. Maybe it’s a poorly thought out effort into new markets or with new products or services. Maybe it’s New Coke! Most of the time, though, it’s a matter of a good plan poorly executed. Execution failures often occur because: 

  • the organization doesn’t have the right people in the right roles with the right capabilities to execute, or
  • the organization’s architecture (systems, structures, processes, and culture) isn’t aligned to the strategy, or
  • the daily efforts of their team members are disconnected from the strategy. 

In Get in Gear: The Seven Gears that Drive Strategy to Results, we outline some of the failure points and how organization’s can better align the seven gears to the results that matter. 

Here’s a really common one: We ask people to outline their top five goals. Then, we ask their leaders to outline what they think the top five goals are. On average, only two out of five match. That means that 60% of the time people are working on the wrong priorities. It’s hard to achieve great results when people are working on the wrong stuff! 

You don’t have to fix all seven gears at once. You can pick the one or two that create the most friction and fix them. You’ll likely get at least somewhat better results. Then, you can work on another to get even better results. 

Over time, individuals and organizations can bring all the gears into much better alignment and achieve dramatically better results for both themselves and the broader organization.

What is your experience with strategic planning? What do you think of Sean's take on the failure points and how to rectify them?

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    Picture of LSSU Admin
    by LSSU Admin - Monday, 28 September 2020, 7:58 PM
    Retrieved from: Old Lean Dude
    Anyone in the world
    I spent 15 years managing a factory where brilliant shopfloor employees devised clever ways to accommodate their three-hand work with simple fixturing, non-slip work surfaces and arrangement of materials within inches of their work. And good for them! They recognized the waste of motion and applied simple countermeasures, most of which they could do without technical support.

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      Picture of LSSU Admin
      by LSSU Admin - Sunday, 27 September 2020, 12:00 PM
      Retrieved from: Lean Blog
      Anyone in the world

      I'm excited that the fifth episode of my new podcast “My Favorite Mistake” is now released! You can listen to it and learn more via my MarkGraban.com website: Episode #5: Billy Taylor on “My Favorite Mistake” in Manufacturing Operations Leadership My guest is Billy Taylor, who you might have seen on stage at one of […]

      The post “My Favorite Mistake” Episode #5: Billy Taylor appeared first on Lean Blog.

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        Picture of LSSU Admin
        by LSSU Admin - Saturday, 26 September 2020, 7:36 PM
        Retrieved from: Michel Baudin's Blog
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        The post on Does Toyota Use SPC? elicited many comments on LinkedIn. Some suggested that it was scoping SPC too narrowly when contrasting it with Toyota’s approach. In fact, SPC as referenced in the post is the body of knowledge described in the American literature on quality and taught in professional courses. As to why […]

        The post More about Toyota and SPC appeared first on Michel Baudin's Blog.

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          Picture of LSSU Admin
          by LSSU Admin - Saturday, 26 September 2020, 6:05 PM
          Retrieved from: Lean Blog
          Anyone in the world

          I've seen a number of people post on LinkedIn about the passing of the legendary “Mr. Oba” of Toyota (sometimes spelled “Mr. Ohba”) — Hajime Oba passed away on September 4th, in Connecticut. I've heard many stories from people who were taught and deeply influenced by Mr. Oba. In 1999 or 2000, Mr. Oba's son […]

          The post Remembering Hajime Oba of Toyota (1945-2020) appeared first on Lean Blog.

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            Picture of LSSU Admin
            by LSSU Admin - Friday, 25 September 2020, 2:08 PM
            Retrieved from: Old Lean Dude
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            Lean Peeve #5: WIP. A blog post by Bruce Hamilton. "Material or information that has been produced too soon, or is ridden with defects and is therefore delayed is referred to by Toyota as stagnation. But for most of the rest of us it's called Work In Process; WIP. The moniker is forgiving: It must be okay, because it's work and it's in process, right?"

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              Anyone in the world

              Wow, I can’t believe it! This past week marks the two month anniversary of the launch of both the ebook and paperback versions of Learning to Lead, Leading to Learn: Lessons from Toyota Leader Isao Yoshino on a Lifetime of Continuous Learning.  So many amazing things have happened since then, and, thanks to your help […]

              The post Reflection is the Beginning….Looking Back and Ahead with “Learning to Lead, Leading to Learn” appeared first on Katie Anderson.

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                Picture of LSSU Admin
                by LSSU Admin - Thursday, 24 September 2020, 7:13 PM
                Retrieved from: Old Lean Dude
                Anyone in the world
                Lean strategy is too often thwarted by status quo organization and policy and, in this case, even the language that describes it.

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                  Anyone in the world

                  Integrate Feedback and Data Analysis to Design Medical Devices Quickly

                  It's no secret recent worldwide events have pushed us all to become more agile in our operations and respond to changes in new ways. Medical device manufacturers have come into the spotlight and are especially vital.

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                    Picture of LSSU Admin
                    by LSSU Admin - Thursday, 24 September 2020, 3:42 PM
                    Retrieved from: Lean Blog
                    Anyone in the world

                    I make mistakes all the time. I do try to make sure I learn from them instead of repeating them over and over. Learning from small mistakes and help prevent big mistakes — I think that's true in the workplace and in our daily lives. This topic is fascinating to me, which is why I […]

                    The post Learning From Mistakes — Stories and Science appeared first on Lean Blog.

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