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by LSSU Admin - Monday, 13 July 2020, 4:00 PM
Retrieved from: Lean Thinking
Anyone in the world
By Pascal Dennis (bio)

Like most people, I went to business and engineering school with the best intentions - get a better job, learn interesting stuff, become a better manager and so on.

But we pick up more than we bargain for - including dysfunctional mental models, which I've written about at length.

We begin to believe that, because we are so smart and well-educated, we can manage from a distance.

And the corollaries:
  1. What can front line workers possible teach us?

  2. Improvement means head office INITIATIVES dreamed up by people -- just like us!

Result?

Endless INITIATIVES stream out of head office.

They crowd out real work and often crush our managers and team members.

Everywhere, I see good people struggling under the weight of actual work plus the funny work head office insists on.

Executives are like crows - they like shiny things.

crow.jpg

Here's some advice:
  1. Resist the temptation

  2. Put the shiny things on a wall in the Executive metrics room

  3. Look at them occasionally, but don't do anything

  4. When the organization has some "white space", pull one off the wall and look at it

Then put it back and forget about it.

Here's a reflection point:

At our old Toyota Motor Manufacturing Canada plant - we never had INITIATIVES

We had tough performance targets set through Strategy Deployment, and the expectation that we'd figure out root causes & countermeasures.

Result: we focused entirely on making the day's production and improving our management system.

We were free to balance continuous improvement with breakthrough.

We owned our management system.

Best,

Pascal


In case you missed our last few blogs... please feel free to have another look…

Point, Flow & System Improvement
Andon – Putting Quality at the Forefront
Lean Outside the Factory - Reverse Magic!
The Beauty of Making Things



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    Picture of LSSU Admin
    by LSSU Admin - Monday, 13 July 2020, 12:00 PM
    Retrieved from: A Lean Journey
    Anyone in the world
    Trust in any organization works on three levels: at a company level in terms of culture, at a team level in regard to the relationships among the members, and at an interpersonal level between two people.
    You can’t always control the level of trust in your organization as a whole, but you can definitely influence it by building trust in your immediate work environment. This may be your department, your work team or your coworkers in the cubicles around yours. Building trust with employees in a...

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      Anyone in the world

      In Episode 17, after not doing an episode of Lean Whiskey in almost two months, Mark Graban and Jamie Flinchbaugh try all sorts of firsts. We had three people, with Jim Huntzinger of Lean Frontiers joining us. We all drank the same whiskey. We used two different whiskies. We talked about 3 different keynotes. OK, […]

      The post Episode #17 of “Lean Whiskey” — Show Firsts: 3 People, 2 Pours, 3 Keynotes appeared first on Lean Blog.

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        Picture of LSSU Admin
        by LSSU Admin - Friday, 10 July 2020, 12:00 PM
        Retrieved from: A Lean Journey
        Anyone in the world
        On Fridays I will post a Lean related Quote. Throughout our lifetimes many people touch our lives and leave us with words of wisdom. These can both be a source of new learning and also a point to pause and reflect upon lessons we have learned. Within Lean active learning is an important aspect on this journey because without learning we can not improve.


        "Be kind, for everyone you meet is fighting a hard battle."   — Ian McLaren

        The illustration and story below, while short, is...

        To continue reading this post click on the title.
        ALeanJourney?d=yIl2AUoC8zAALeanJourney?i=Pvh13Bd13qI:5bWNhfWyLgc:4cEx4HpKnUUALeanJourney?d=qj6IDK7rITsALeanJourney?i=Pvh13Bd13qI:5bWNhfWyLgc:V_sGLiPBpWU

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          Anyone in the world

          The BOM Rap recommended restricting the centrally managed part of the Bill Of Materials (BOM) of an assembly plant to the Gozinto (“goes-into”) structure of the items — that is, triplets with an item ID, the ID of an item it goes into, and the quantity used, together with an item list carrying units of […]

          The post The BOM Rap (Part II) — The Vàzsonyi procedure appeared first on Michel Baudin's Blog.

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            Picture of LSSU Admin
            by LSSU Admin - Thursday, 9 July 2020, 7:12 PM
            Retrieved from: Lean Blog
            Anyone in the world

            My guest for Episode #375 of the podcast is Mohamed Saleh, Ph.D. Dr. Saleh has been a practitioner in Lean & Six Sigma transformations, in both manufacturing and service sectors. Mohamed was directly mentored by one of the country's foremost experts on enterprise-wide Lean transformation and the Toyota Production System (TPS). He has extensive experience […]

            The post Podcast #375 — Mohamed Saleh, PhD on Lean in Healthcare appeared first on Lean Blog.

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              Anyone in the world

              Detect Small Shifts in the Process Mean with Exponentially Weighted Moving Average (EWMA) Charts

              Control charts are specialized time series plots that help you determine if a process is in statistical control. Although some of the most widely used ones like Xbar-R and Individuals charts are great at detecting relatively large shifts in the process (1.5+ sigma shifts), you will need something different for smaller shifts. Enter the Exponentially Weighted Moving Average (EWMA) chart.

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                Anyone in the world

                Harvey Balls: Some of the Best-Presenting Visual Comparisons You Might Not Have Even Heard Of

                You’ve seen them before. You might have even used them. Harvey balls are symbols to visually communicate qualitative information like project status, product features and employee performance. Unfortunately, making the symbols can be time-consuming in different programs. Thankfully, an easy-to-use and versatile Harvey Balls matrix is now available in Minitab Workspace and Companion by Minitab.

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                  Anyone in the world
                  A crisis pressure-tests leadership and culture. Many new values are formed under the strain, and employees gain new perspectives on their organization and its leadership. Communication is the key to keeping them motivated and productive in a season of enormous distraction.
                  The COVID-19 pandemic isn’t my first financial crisis. No matter how well you run a business, external forces will test you, your culture, and your resolve. Leaders are constantly processing the future, and our employees are...

                  To continue reading this post click on the title.
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                    Picture of LSSU Admin
                    by LSSU Admin - Tuesday, 7 July 2020, 1:00 PM
                    Retrieved from: AllAboutLean.com
                    Anyone in the world
                    In my last posts I discussed basics and workshop preparation for design for manufacturing and assembly (DFMA), as well as the questions for design for manufacturing (DFM). The juiciest part, however, is the options for design for assembly (DFA). This post starts with the specific questions to ask for design for assembly. However, there are ... Read more

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