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On Fridays I will post a Lean related Quote. Throughout our lifetimes many people touch our lives and leave us with words of wisdom. These can both be a source of new learning and also a point to pause and reflect upon lessons we have learned. Within Lean active learning is an important aspect on this journey because without learning we can not improve.


"I want to be happy. I realized that being happy isn't necessarily about getting there; it's how you get there."  — Ben Huh...

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by LSSU Admin - Thursday, 7 November 2019, 4:15 PM
Retrieved from: Blog – JFlinch
Anyone in the world

In Episode 9 of Lean Whiskey, Mark Graban and Jamie Flinchbaugh link up on Halloween night to share a drink and ideas about lean. We discuss air travel, which we both experience in volume, and taste affordable whiskeys under $35.  We both agree handing out whiskey for Halloween would be

The post Lean Whiskey [Episode 9] appeared first on JFlinch.

 
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by LSSU Admin - Thursday, 7 November 2019, 5:39 AM
Retrieved from: Kevin Meyer
Anyone in the world
Most of us have learned that being busy does not mean you’re being productive and that multitasking leads to being less productive – although I still see that being harped as a “skill” on resumes and profiles.  Leading organizations manage by clearly defined objectives rather than arbitrary and often unrelated work hours, enabling flexible workplaces […]
 
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by LSSU Admin - Wednesday, 6 November 2019, 12:00 PM
Retrieved from: A Lean Journey
Anyone in the world
For my Facebook fans you already know about this great feature. But for those of you that are not connected to A Lean Journey on Facebook or Twitter I post daily a feature I call Lean Tips.  It is meant to be advice, things I learned from experience, and some knowledge tidbits about Lean to help you along your journey.  Another great reason to like A Lean Journey on Facebook.

Click this link for A Lean Journey's Facebook Page Notes Feed.
Here is the next addition of tips from the...

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Anyone in the world

It's great to have Jamie Flinchbaugh back for another episode of the Lean Whiskey podcast. We linked up on Halloween night to share a drink and ideas about lean. We discuss air travel, which we both experience in volume, and taste affordable whiskeys under $35.  We both agree handing out whiskey for Halloween would be […]

The post Episode #9 of the “Lean Whiskey” Podcast: Affordable Bourbon, Halloween, Air Travel, Six Sigma, and Lean as a 2nd Job? appeared first on Lean Blog.

 
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by LSSU Admin - Tuesday, 5 November 2019, 8:40 PM
Retrieved from: Minitab Blog
Anyone in the world

Quality Professional looks at DMAIC or DFSS Roadmaps

When first learning about Six Sigma, it can be a little overwhelming to familiarize yourself with all the different terminology, methodologies, frameworks and acronyms included. From FMEA, C&E Matrix, to Gage R&R, SIPOC, and DMAIC…the list goes on and on!

The acronyms of DMAIC, DMADV, and DFSS can be some of the trickiest to keep straight though since they sound the most similar; however we can help you with that!

 
Anyone in the world
This is the third post on my series on the inner workings of the Amazon Fulfillment Center. In this post I start with the highly interesting process of the outbound value stream (i.e., how the goodies go from storage to your door). Since this is the core process, the next post will continue this outbound … Continue reading The Inner Workings of Amazon Fulfillment Centers – Part 3
 
Anyone in the world
This is the third post on my series on the inner workings of the Amazon Fulfillment Center. In this post I start with the highly interesting process of the outbound value stream (i.e., how the goodies go from storage to your door). Since this is the core process, the next post will continue this outbound … Continue reading The Inner Workings of Amazon Fulfillment Centers – Part 3
 
Anyone in the world

“The ability to react to process changes is more important than protecting yourself from occasional false alarms. […] So do not worry so much about straining out the gnats of false alarms that you end up swallowing the camels of undetected process changes.” Sourced through Quality Digest Michel Baudin‘s comments: The people of the Honda […]

The post Phase Two Charts and Their Probability Limits | Don Wheeler | Quality Digest appeared first on Michel Baudin's Blog.

 
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by LSSU Admin - Monday, 4 November 2019, 4:00 PM
Retrieved from: Lean Thinking
Anyone in the world
By Al Norval (bio)

As an engineer in school I studied the physical sciences - Chemistry, Physics, Differential Calculus and my favorite Statistics but lately I’ve been studying things which I would have laughed at when I was in Engineering school. That is the behavioral sciences of Adult Learning and Change Management. Specifically I’m interested in why people are afraid of change, how to overcome it and how to maximize the learning we get from making changes.

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Turns out it goes way back to the dawn of humanity as our brains were developing. Simply put, our brains have three sections; the reptilian or limbic brain located at the brain stem which controls our basic functions; our mammalian brain which contains our emotional center, and the prefrontal cortex which is the part of the brain that is most developed in primates and makes us most human in that it contains the reasoning and logic centers.

Our limbic system is much older than the other structures in our brains and developed to manage the “Flight or Fight” response. That’s the part of our brain that responds to threatening situations with a response that decides either to run away – the flight or to stand and fight. The decision isn’t based on logic or even emotion but is decided upon by this ancient part of our brain that overrides the other more highly advanced sections of the brain. It’s a basic survival mechanism.

What has this got to do with Kaizen?

This same mechanism kicks in when we are faced with changes. Its part of the fear of change and overcoming it is a large part of change management.

I’d like to suggest that kaizen can be a great way of overcoming this fear of change and can greatly simplify change management. By kaizen I mean kaizen as small, steady, relentless continuous improvement not as big workshops or events. The kind of Quick & Easy Kaizen that is practiced every day.

Turns out we can absorb small changes and that a series of small changes is easier to make than one big change. The key is the repetition. Small daily changes quickly turn into a routine that is no longer threatening. It becomes a habit and minimizes the threat and so minimizes the Flight or Fight response.

Small changes add up to big improvements over time. That’s not to say there isn’t the need for the occasional kaizen workshop but temper them with daily kaizen perhaps at a ratio of 10:1 or even 100:1

The words of Taiichi Ohno ring in my ears “Every day a little bit higher”.

What does this mean for the Lean community? Don’t fight basic biology. Combine daily Quick & Easy Kaizen with a focus on delivering Customer value you can use it to your advantage. You’ll get more improvement done quicker with less resistance. Go ahead and try it. I’d love to hear how you did.

Cheers,

Al


In case you missed our last few blogs... please feel free to have another look…

Is Inventory a waste or a cover-up of deeper waste?
7 Basic Quality Tools – Are they underrated?
What Does Leader as a Teacher Really Mean?
PDCA - the Pounding Heart Muscle of Life


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