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by LSSU Admin - Monday, 14 September 2020, 12:00 PM
Retrieved from: Lean Blog
Anyone in the world

By Joseph E. Swartz (in honor of my father, James B. Swartz) “He could have added fortune to fame, but caring for neither, he found happiness and honor in being helpful to the world.”[i] George Washington Carver's epitaph. When I was 12 years old, my father moved my mother, my siblings, and me from a […]

The post To Be of the Greatest Good — George Washington Carver appeared first on Lean Blog.

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by LSSU Admin - Friday, 11 September 2020, 9:31 PM
Retrieved from: Old Lean Dude
Anyone in the world
In the words of improvement expert Tomo Sugiyama, in The Improvement Book, "practice makes permanent, not perfect". Or to paraphrase Deming Prize winner Ryuji Fukuda from Managerial Engineering, "Before you practice, first be sure you are learning from a good teacher". Practicing a bad golf swing does not improve it. Too many organizations spend millions for new technology, but then skimp on training employees how to use it. Perhaps this is because the technology is an “investment,” but training is an “expense.”
 
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by LSSU Admin - Friday, 11 September 2020, 12:00 PM
Retrieved from: A Lean Journey
Anyone in the world
On Fridays I will post a Lean related Quote. Throughout our lifetimes many people touch our lives and leave us with words of wisdom. These can both be a source of new learning and also a point to pause and reflect upon lessons we have learned. Within Lean active learning is an important aspect on this journey because without learning we can not improve.


"Being a leader doesn’t require a tittle; having a title doesn’t make you one."   — Anthony T. Eaton
Whilst position and...

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by LSSU Admin - Thursday, 10 September 2020, 8:36 PM
Retrieved from: Michel Baudin's Blog
Anyone in the world

Factories are controlled environments, designed to put out consistent products in volumes according to a plan. Controls, however, are never perfect, and managers respond to series of events of both internal and external origin. An event is an instantaneous state change, with a timestamp but no duration. An operation on a manufacturing shop floor is […]

The post Series Of Events In Manufacturing appeared first on Michel Baudin's Blog.

 
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by LSSU Admin - Thursday, 10 September 2020, 12:00 PM
Retrieved from: Lean Blog
Anyone in the world

Joining me today for Episode #384 of the podcast is Craig Gygi, co-author of the book Six Sigma for Dummies. He also managing principal and owner of the firm Strategic Productivity. You can read his full bio there. He also has an online course called “Truth About Data” which covers statistical process control for business metrics, […]

The post Podcast #384 — Craig Gygi on the “Truth About Data” appeared first on Lean Blog.

 
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by LSSU Admin - Wednesday, 9 September 2020, 12:00 PM
Retrieved from: A Lean Journey
Anyone in the world
We’re all in a storm these days especially considering today’s contentious political, racial, and pandemic climates.  Building resilience in life isn’t as easy as it sounds, but with the right support, it might actually be simpler than you think. In The Resilient Leader, author Christine Perakis shares strategies you can use to navigate life and business. Christine tells her tale of surviving not one but two Category 5 hurricanes. But she does so by weaving leadership principles into her...

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by LSSU Admin - Tuesday, 8 September 2020, 3:41 PM
Retrieved from: Old Lean Dude
Anyone in the world
With all the gloom and doom of the Coronavirus, the divisive political climate and the Zoom fatigue, this has been a tough summer. Here is a whimsical post to kick off the fall about applying Lean thinking when you’re stuck at home.
 
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by LSSU Admin - Tuesday, 8 September 2020, 3:20 PM
Retrieved from: Lean Blog
Anyone in the world

I'm excited that the second episode of my new podcast “My Favorite Mistake” is now released! You can listen to it and learn more via my MarkGraban.com website: Interview with Congressman Will Hurd on Learning From a Campaign Mistake and the CIA — Episode #2 of My Favorite Mistake My guest is the Representative from […]

The post “My Favorite Mistake” Episode #2: Rep. Will Hurd (R-TX) appeared first on Lean Blog.

 
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by LSSU Admin - Tuesday, 8 September 2020, 1:00 PM
Retrieved from: AllAboutLean.com
Anyone in the world

Line balancing is one of the important methods for improving your production system. The idea is to give every process the same workload so all processes are busy all the time. However, there are cases where it may be better NOT to balance a line. This post will look into when and why you may ... Read more

The post When NOT to Balance a Line first appeared on AllAboutLean.com.

 
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by LSSU Admin - Monday, 7 September 2020, 4:00 PM
Retrieved from: Lean Thinking
Anyone in the world
By Pascal Dennis (bio)

Jidoka is lovely Japanese word with multiple meanings:
  • Automation with a human touch,
  • Humanized or intelligent automation

Essentially, Jidoka entails giving processes, automated and otherwise, sufficient ‘awareness’ so they can:
  • Detect process malfunctions or product defects
  • Stop, and
  • Alert the operator

Perhaps the simplest definition is ‘to build quality into process using embedded, binary tests’.


Here is a charming example: when our son Matthew was younger, and shooting up like a bean sprout, there were frequent checks on the ‘clothing situation’.

As far as I can tell, the process steps include:
  1. Put questionable trousers, shirts and sweaters on top of Matthew’s bed,
  2. Matthew tries on each piece, and
  3. We keep or discard said piece based on a series of tests.

Here are the tests my wife & Matthew have devised for shirts and sweaters:
  1. Can Matthew get it over his noggin?
  2. Do the sleeves come up above the wrist?
  3. When he raises his arms, can you see his belly button?

These are applied in sequence, of course. You’ll notice they are binary and therefore, self-diagnostic.

The process is very effective – I’d estimate the first time through (FTT) is 100%. It also generates big laughs for the whole family.

Especially ridiculous fits trigger a droll Matthew parade. “Hey everyone, look at this one!”

Best regards,

Pascal


In case you missed our last few blogs... please feel free to have another look…

Standardized Work for Knowledge Workers
Difference between Hansei and a Post-mortem
TPS and Agile
Beware INITIATIVES



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