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by LSSU Admin - Monday, 28 December 2020, 3:48 PM
Retrieved from: Lean Blog
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Thanks as always to Ryan McCormick for this… there's always so much good reading, listening, and viewing shared here by him! 2020 was an unusual year.  As much as I look forward to seeing it in the rearview mirror, I also realize adversity and change is a formidable teacher.  I learned a lot this year, […]

The post Operational Excellence Mixtape: Best of 2020 appeared first on Lean Blog.

 
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by LSSU Admin - Monday, 28 December 2020, 12:00 PM
Retrieved from: A Lean Journey
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I always say that “silence is acceptance” which essentially mean you deserve what you tolerate. It is a necessary part of any organization to give feedback to employees based on their expected performance. Sometime positive discipline is needed to shape up poor performers. The discipline you apply should be aimed at correcting behavior or performance, not punishing the employee. Many times a correction can be accomplished by a friendly discussion with the employee.

This discussion with an...

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by LSSU Admin - Wednesday, 23 December 2020, 12:00 PM
Retrieved from: A Lean Journey
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Having leadership qualities and characteristics is considered today as one of the most valued personality traits in the business world; especially for those who claim to be leaders and cannot be compared with that concept. It is known that some have achieved these characteristics and have gone from being small corporations to growing exponentially and being recognized. But what are the main characteristics of good leadership? Those who achieve a good synergy...

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by LSSU Admin - Tuesday, 22 December 2020, 12:00 PM
Retrieved from: AllAboutLean.com
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This second post in a series on how to reduce your lead time looks deeper at the effect of fluctuations and utilization. Improving these will reduce your inventory and hence, as per Little’s Law, reduce your lead time. Reduce Fluctuations Your inventory helps you to cover fluctuations. The next step would be to reduce fluctuations ... Read more

The post Reducing Lead Time 2 – Fluctuations and Utilization first appeared on AllAboutLean.com.
 
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by LSSU Admin - Tuesday, 22 December 2020, 11:00 AM
Retrieved from: Lean Blog
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Here's a musical holiday treat for my regular Lean Blog readers and podcast listeners, a song parody, originally released back in 2009: “Gemba Claus is Comin' to Town“ Gemba Claus is Comin' to Town Lyrics by Mark GrabanPerformance by Steve Sholtes Oh, you'd better watch outYou'd better kaizenYou'd better not pout, I'm tellin' ya thenGemba […]

The post [Song] Gemba Claus is Comin’ to Town! appeared first on Lean Blog.

 
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At the beginning of this month, Brian Strobel published an intriguing new book entitled Pursuing Excellence: A Values-Based, Systems Approach to Help Companies Become More Resilient, which interestingly posits that a company doesn’t implement Operational Excellence as a methodology, model, or tool. Instead, a company realizes Operational Excellence. It does so by integrating effective leadership, teamwork, problem-solving, systems thinking, and continuous improvement. It achieves this by aligning strategies, empowering employees, optimizing business processes, and improving the customer experience.

When I spoke with Brian recently, I asked him: “Why do most companies fail when they strive to become more efficient and resilient?” Here is his full answer:

I think the fact that people are starting to ask questions like this proves there’s a growing recognition our previous ways of doing things aren’t working.

The way that we’ve managed our companies has remained largely unchanged since the 18th century. Since then, different philosophies have come and gone, but the central ideas for what it takes to manage our companies have remained fairly consistent.

And our approach to achieve continuous improvement must also change.

I believe that our legacy approaches to continuous improvement, to include Lean and Six Sigma, are failing to consider the whole system and account for the leadership principles necessary for success. These previous methods placed too much emphasis on the specific improvement methodology, without proper consideration for the entire system and surrounding culture, systems and structures, values and beliefs, and the particulars of our marketspace..

As I write in my latest book Pursuing Excellence, “our companies are struggling with ways to become more competitive, to reduce costs, and the chase unobtanium in their never-ending pursuit to do more with less. But to survive, this focus on efficiency must not come at the expense of innovation, agility, and moving fast."

The world is now a new place, with new rules. Succeeding will require new ways of looking at our problems. And the lens of operational excellence can help us view these things from a different perspective.

A lens is something that bends and refracts light to alter our vision. It allows us to see things differently. The right kind of lens takes what’s already there, and through convergence and divergence, provides a different perspective to view the subject. It focuses our vision on those things we need to see with more clarity.

These ideas that make up the lens of operational excellence, as shown here, provide us the context for what must be considered as we move towards driving change with a fundamental understanding that we must have everyone aware of why we need to change. In this regard, the lens helps guide the vision for our companies to become more resilient and move closer to achieving excellence.

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What do you think of Brian's thoughts? How have continuous-improvement initiatives affected your company? 

 
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by LSSU Admin - Monday, 21 December 2020, 12:00 PM
Retrieved from: A Lean Journey
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2020 has been… interesting, to say the least. To find meaning in a chaotic year, it is important to pause and reflect on the lessons we have learned and how we have grown. The COVID-19 pandemic has turned our lives upside down and changed not just the way we live and work but also how we think and behave. Every part of the world has been affected, and every aspect of life has been impacted. Our everyday routines were brought to a stop, and any sense of normalcy was lost. While we stop and look...

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I was planning on easing into the holidays, staying safe and healthy at home, trying to be thankful and appreciative for all that I have… and then this article ran across my radar via a Google Alert for the phrase “lean hospitals.”: HOSPITAL CEOS HAVE GOTTEN RICH CUTTING STAFF AND SUPPLIES. NOW THEY'RE NOT READY […]

The post Responding to a One-Sided Article That Trashes Lean in Healthcare [Updated] appeared first on Lean Blog.

 
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by LSSU Admin - Friday, 18 December 2020, 5:48 PM
Retrieved from: Minitab Blog
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Celebrate the Holidays: Using DOE to Bake a Better Cookie

It's that time of year again for holiday bakers and cookie monsters to unite over lots of delicious treats (and we definitely deserve them after this very long year)! 

So what’s a baker with quality on their mind to do when their favorite sugar cookie recipe made cookies that failed to hold their festive holiday shape after being baked? Run a Design of Experiment (DOE), of course!

 
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by LSSU Admin - Friday, 18 December 2020, 12:00 PM
Retrieved from: A Lean Journey
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Throughout our lifetimes many people touch our lives and leave us with words of wisdom. These can both be a source of new learning and also a point to pause and reflect upon lessons we have learned. Within Lean active learning is an important aspect on this journey because without learning we cannot improve.

10. "Attitude is a little thing that makes a big difference."   — Winston Churchill 9. "People don't resist change. They resist being changed."   — Peter Senge 8. "It...

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