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by LSSU Admin - Monday, 10 June 2019, 1:26 PM
Retrieved from: Lead With Lean
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I often get asked “how do you move from gemba coaching to executive coaching?” which I find kind of surprising because the whole point of executive coaching is to get execs to the gemba, looking into the details, discussing with […]

The post Lean executive coaching appeared first on Lead With Lean.

 
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by LSSU Admin - Saturday, 8 June 2019, 5:43 PM
Retrieved from: Kevin Meyer
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Last weekend I powered through David Epstein’s new book, Range: Why Generalists Triumph in a Specialized World. The book has received rave reviews from the likes of Daniel Pink, who calls it “an essential read for bosses, parents, coaches, and anyone who cares about improving performance.”  Through numerous stories and data, Epstein’s primary premise is that […]
 
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by LSSU Admin - Friday, 7 June 2019, 1:41 AM
Retrieved from: Lean – Katie Anderson
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A vision realized….and continues! Just three weeks ago, I was in the midst of leading a week of learning, culture, and fun with a fabulous group of 17 lean practitioners in Japan on the 2nd KBJA Japan Study Trip! When I moved to Japan 4.5 years ago, it was with the intention to learn and […]

The post KBJA Japan Study Trip 2019 Highlights appeared first on Katie Anderson.

 
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by LSSU Admin - Thursday, 6 June 2019, 6:00 PM
Retrieved from: Blog – JFlinch
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Originally Posted: by Jamie Flinchbaugh on 10/22/2009 Direct observation has been an under-appreciated aspect of lean for most of its life. It has gotten a lot more attention in recent years, unfortunately, this is thanks in part to the use of jargon, such as gemba and genchi genbutsu. For those

The post Observe with Purpose [[From the Archives]] appeared first on JFlinch.

 
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How the taste of wine is described often reads like a poem: “full-bodied and rich but not heavy, high in alcohol, yet neither acidic nor tannic, with substantial black cherry flavor despite its delicacy...” Flowers and fruits are commonly used as descriptors, meant to help drinkers understand the flavors in a glass of wine. This poetry reflects that some consider the conversion of fruit to wine be an art form.

Yet flavor all comes down to chemical compounds that impact the taste of your wine. Behind the loving descriptions of wine as living art, there’s science. And statistical regression can help.

 
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by LSSU Admin - Monday, 3 June 2019, 4:00 PM
Retrieved from: Lean Thinking
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By Pascal Dennis (bio)

Let me build on my earlier blog on Lean, Leadership & Ethics

The ancients defined Four Cardinal Virtues:

Prudence, Temperance, Justice and Courage.

Courage -- the capacity to overcome fear -- is perhaps the most admired.

In Getting the Right Things Done, I defined True North, our strategic and philosophical purpose, as follows:

"Something for the head, something for the heart..."

How does courage relate to True North?

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Breakthrough -- transcendent, enduring achievement -- requires all the Cardinal Virtues, and courage most of all.

Courage, like True North, entails head and heart. Courage without the head is simply foolhardiness.

Courage means you understand the risks, and do it anyway.

Is courage a virtue under any circumstance? I'd say not. (Is a courageous terrorist admirable?)

Courage is admirable when exercised in the service of others, of a greater good, of True North.

In summary, achieving True North requires all the cardinal virtues and none more than courage.

In fact, all the virtues depend on courage.

Best regards,

Pascal


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by LSSU Admin - Tuesday, 28 May 2019, 3:07 PM
Retrieved from: Blog – JFlinch
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Have you ever delegated a task and the team or person you delegated the task to goes down the wrong path? This often happens when management delegates a problem-solving task but have already determined what they want the answer to that problem to be. There is a time for delegation

The post Delegating Improvement appeared first on JFlinch.

 
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While there are many books written on the basics of the "supply" side of the supply chain (i.e. strategic sourcing, sourcing/procurement and purchasing), however, there hasn’t been much written on those areas from a Lean perspective. That situation was rectified when Paul Myerson published his significant book entitled Lean Demand-Driven Procurement: How to Apply Lean Thinking to Your Supply Management Processes.

I recently spoke with Paul Myerson and asked him: "Why haven’t organizations placed more emphasis on applying Lean principles to procurement and purchasing processes?" Here is his complete response:

While there are a fair number of books, articles, and blogs written on the basics of the “supply” side of the supply chain (i.e., strategic sourcing, sourcing/procurement, and purchasing), there hasn’t been much written on those areas from a Lean perspective. This is quite surprising, considering not only that supply chain costs (primarily procurement and transportation), can range from 50% to 70% of sales, resulting in what is known as the “profit-leverage” effect (measured by the increase in profit obtained by a decrease in purchase spend), but also helps drive downstream quality, productivity, and efficiency.

If you were to ask someone who knew a bit about Lean thinking how they defined Lean procurement, they would probably say that it’s about increasing productivity for procurement staff so they can spend more time on value-added activities rather than administration. While that is certainly true, it is also important to extend the view to how it connects and interacts with other processes, functions, suppliers, and customers, as today, procurement plays an important role in improving the flow of information and materials throughout the entire supply chain.

It is important to establish best practice Lean procurement functions that go beyond contract negotiation and establish crucial operational requirements, utilizing strategic sourcing activities such as market research, vendor evaluation and integration to support Lean activities such as Just-In-Time and Vendor Managed Inventory (VMI) programs.


Furthermore, inventory management and sourcing supply chain decisions are directly linked to a company’s financial performance and can, as a result, can affect a company’s cash flow and profitability.

Therefore, a procurement organization must consider:

• The prevention of production disruptions due to inventory or material shortages, while remaining flexible to meet changes in customer demand or cope with market volatility.

• The trade-offs of inventory carrying costs and customer service levels.

• Optimal buying quantities that consider the trade-offs of inventory carrying cost and volume discounts.

• Moving from reactive to proactive procurement operations.

In summary, Lean procurement provides opportunities for process improvements and savings through cost reduction, eliminating wasted time and efforts, and improved cost analysis, and can improve contract compliance and develop better, sustained partnerships with suppliers and other business partners.

What do you think of Paul's perspective on Lean procurement? Does your company apply Lean principles to its procurement and purchasing processes? What results have you seen?
 
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by LSSU Admin - Thursday, 23 May 2019, 9:21 PM
Retrieved from: Blog – JFlinch
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In Episode 2 of Lean Whiskey, Mark Graban and Jamie Flinchbaugh, longtime friends, lean thinkers, and whiskey enthusiasts, join forces to enjoy a casual conversation — mostly about lean and a little bit about whiskey. We start by thanking the listeners of Episode 1 who shared their response to hearing

The post Lean Whiskey [Episode 2] appeared first on JFlinch.

 
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by LSSU Admin - Monday, 20 May 2019, 4:00 PM
Retrieved from: Lean Thinking
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By Pascal Dennis (bio)

Been reflecting about each of these lately, and how they relate.

But what’s Ethics got to do with anything?

We’re in a proverbial knowledge economy. The market caps of, say, Google, Facebook and Apple, dwarf that of Toyota.

Google, Facebook and Apple have comparatively little in physical capital. ‘All’ they have is intellectual capital, and in particular, human capital.

How does human capital differ, from say, physical or financial capital?

Unlike, say, a machine, or a bond, human capital can chose not to deploy. Human capital can chose to walk out the door, in fact.

“That army will win which has the same spirit,” said Sun Tsu twenty-five hundred years ago. It’s never been more true.

sun-tzu.jpg

Yet Gallup’s latest State of the Global Workplace report tells us that only 13% of employees are engaged in their work!

Big company disease and organizational dysfunction is so deeply entrenched that we barely flinch at such data.

Imagine you’re a factory manager and your machines are operating at only 13% of capacity!

Why are people so disengaged? Gallup doesn’t say. But I suspect that disillusionment, or even disgust, at what the organization stands for, or how management behaves, is a major reason.

There’s more. Millennials (those born after 1980) will comprise 75% of the workforce by 2025. And Gallup tells us that ethical behavior in corporations is even more important to millennials than to their parents.

Of course Ethics matters. People will not follow swine, at least not willingly, for very long. People will certainly not commit their hearts and minds – unless they feel good about what the organization stands for.

Best regards,

Pascal


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