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by LSSU Admin - Monday, 13 January 2020, 4:00 PM
Retrieved from: Lean Thinking
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By Al Norval (bio)

We talk a lot about the House of Lean with its foundation of Standards & Stability and the two pillars of Just In Time and Jidoka supporting a roof of Customer and Strategic Direction which together encompass engaged Team Members continually solving problems.

All of this makes sense but what is this Japanese word – Jidoka?

poke_2020.jpg

It’s built in quality at the source. Rather than try to inspect and test quality in by looking for defects on finished product, a losing cause at best, lean organizations build in quality at the actual value added operation. That way defects can be caught early and they don’t have to reply as heavily on final inspection testing.

The big advantage to Jidoka is that by catching defects early in the process, they are closer to the actual process conditions that caused the defect and therefore closer to root cause. They can launch problem solving faster with a higher chance of getting to root cause since the process conditions wouldn’t have changed as much.

Jidoka has four parts:
  • Detecting defects
  • Alerting or signaling a problem
  • Immediate response - temporary countermeasures to get running again
  • Root cause problem solving and countermeasures to prevent the occurrence of the defect.

This is where Poka-Yoke comes in. It’s about the final step in Jidoka of preventing the re-occurrence of the defect. Lean organizations realize that errors are inevitable. Human beings make errors that cause defects. By eliminating the possibility of the error being made, defects could be eliminated. Poka-Yoke is used to prevent these errors being made. Translated it means “Preventing inadvertent mistakes” since it’s believed people don’t make mistakes on purpose. This is consistent with the lean principle of “Respect for People”

The best Poka-Yoke devices are physical devices that eliminate the possibility of an error occurring. Weaker Poka-Yoke countermeasures would be signs and warning systems but these could be overridden and the error could still occur.

Organizations are always looking for ways to get employees involved and having teams develop Poka-Yoke devices that prevent errors from being made is a great way to do this. It’s a win-win. Employees are engaged in problem solving, quality gets better for customers.

For more on Poka-Yoke, download the free Lean Pathways “LEAN MANIFESTO

Cheers

Al


In case you missed our last few blogs... please feel free to have another look…

Making the Invisible Visible in Design Projects
Two Pillars of the Lean Business System
Why Do We Learn More from What Did Not Work?
Failure is a Requirement for Innovation



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by LSSU Admin - Monday, 13 January 2020, 12:00 PM
Retrieved from: A Lean Journey
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For most people today, the majority of their time awake is spent at work. It’s quite normal for someone to spend more time with colleagues than with families. With this in mind, it becomes really important to make the workplace a positive and nurturing environment. Studies show that positive workplaces increase productivity, creativity, and happiness. Here are some great suggestions for building a more positive workplace. 1. Gratitude is keyCreate a mechanism in your workplace for everyone to...

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by LSSU Admin - Friday, 10 January 2020, 6:01 PM
Retrieved from: Blog – JFlinch
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In Episode 11 of Lean Whiskey, Mark Graban gets a rest, and Jamie Flinchbaugh co-hosts along with long-time friend and colleague Susan Pleasant, who was first a client and later a partner. Susan brings 30 years of operations experience, and has consulted for 12 years, first at the Lean Learning

The post Lean Whiskey [Episode 11] appeared first on JFlinch.

 
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On Fridays I will post a Lean related Quote. Throughout our lifetimes many people touch our lives and leave us with words of wisdom. These can both be a source of new learning and also a point to pause and reflect upon lessons we have learned. Within Lean active learning is an important aspect on this journey because without learning we can not improve.


"Let's not do it your way or my way; let's do it the best way."  — Greg Anderson

Normally, when we look at a problem, we...

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In Episode 11 of Lean Whiskey, Mark Graban gets a rest, and Jamie Flinchbaugh co-hosts along with long-time friend and colleague Susan Pleasant, who was first a client and later a partner. Susan brings 30 years of operations experience, and has consulted for 12 years, first at the Lean Learning Center and now with SPleasant […]

The post Episode #11 of the “Lean Whiskey” Podcast: A King is Saved, and a Workweek Shortened appeared first on Lean Blog.

 
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Managing CI projects with Companion by Minitab

As the vice president of quality for a $1.5 billion-dollar industrial corporation, Hermann Miskelly is responsible for leading its continuous improvement effort. Now in his 10th year of a Lean Six Sigma deployment, he has overseen the execution of more than 4,000 major improvement projects and another 6,000 small improvement projects. Here are three key insights he shared about managing continuous improvement projects, with the help of Companion by Minitab.

 
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by LSSU Admin - Thursday, 9 January 2020, 3:28 PM
Retrieved from: Lean Blog
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Normally, I like being the interviewer, but today I'd like to share a podcast where I was the one being interviewed. But, really, I think it was a nice conversation with a professor of healthcare management studies, Alfred Angerer, from just outside of Zurich, Switzerland. I had the opportunity to spend a morning with Alfred […]

The post A Podcast Talking Lean Healthcare with a Swiss Professor appeared first on Lean Blog.

 
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by LSSU Admin - Wednesday, 8 January 2020, 12:00 PM
Retrieved from: A Lean Journey
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For my Facebook fans you already know about this great feature. But for those of you that are not connected to A Lean Journey on Facebook or Twitter I post daily a feature I call Lean Tips.  It is meant to be advice, things I learned from experience, and some knowledge tidbits about Lean to help you along your journey.  Another great reason to like A Lean Journey on Facebook.

Click this link for A Lean Journey's Facebook Page Notes Feed.
Here is the next addition of tips from the...

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Joining me for episode #354 of the podcast is Kim Hollon, the CEO and President of Signature Healthcare, based in Brockton, Massachusetts. I first met Kim about a decade ago and, as we discover during the podcast discussion, one of my Lean healthcare clients in Dallas was later an important influence in Kim's discovery and […]

The post Podcast #354 — Kim Hollon on the CEO’s Role in Lean and Patient Safety [With Transcript] appeared first on Lean Blog.

 
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by LSSU Admin - Tuesday, 7 January 2020, 5:00 PM
Retrieved from: Blog – JFlinch
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Theranos has captured the attention of many, in part because the hype surrounding its founder reached such massive peaks, and partly because the degree of fraud is on par with 19th-century snake oil salesmen, except on a billion-dollar scale. To be sure, we’ve seen large-scale fraud or misconduct before. We

The post Board of Director Lessons from Theranos appeared first on JFlinch.