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Back in August, I handed over my blog to Deondra Wardelle for the week and that became the #RootCauseRacism series. I'm proud of how those blog posts (and webinar) turned out. I bought the domain name rootcauseracism.com and I told Deondra that I would give it to her to help further her efforts. She built […]

The post Why I’m Partnering Again for #RootCauseRacism, Series 2 @ www.RootCauseRacism.com appeared first on Lean Blog.

 
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by LSSU Admin - Monday, 19 October 2020, 4:00 PM
Retrieved from: Lean Thinking
Anyone in the world
By Pascal Dennis

I owe this gem to our friends & colleagues in the great state of Alabama.

Our partners there have a way with words, and a fine appreciation of Lean fundamentals.

Lean is ‘simple’, is it not?
  1. Define Purpose clearly
  2. Make problems visible at all levels
  3. Treat people with respect – team members, customers, suppliers and the community
  4. Involve everybody In problem solving
Lean methods like visual management, standardized work, Help Chains and the like are about making problems visible, so we can fix them.


Once the problem is visible, the countermeasure is often obvious, no?

To be sure, some problems (e.g. Strategic, Design, Supply Chain, machine, information flow etc.) are complex and have multiple causes.

Countermeasures reveal themselves only after much reflection and experimentation. Lean methods enable this process. (Without them we often jump to a dumb-ass ‘countermeasure’)

An old Henny Youngman joke goes like this:

Henny, flapping his arms like wings. “I went to my doctor and told him it hurts when I do this!” Henny makes a face. “The doctor told me, don’t do that!”

Lean methods help us understand what ‘that’ is, so we can fix it.

Our challenge is that we often learn dumb-ass things in college and in dysfunctional organizations. Things like, let’s hide our problems, let’s brutalize our team members, let’s try to hoodwink our customers, and the like.

The truth will out.

Don’t be a dumb-ass.

Best regards,

Pascal

PS Andy & Me and the Hospital, describes how not to be a dumb-ass in healthcare.




In case you missed our last few blogs... please feel free to have another look…

Lean – So ‘Easy’, It’s Hard
“Failing to Plan is Planning to Fail”
Building Quality into the Process
Standardized Work for Knowledge Workers



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Anyone in the world

I'm excited that Episode #11 of my new podcast “My Favorite Mistake” is now released! You can listen to it and learn more via my MarkGraban.com website: Episode #11: Donnis Todd and Dan Garrison on Their “Favorite Mistakes” in Making and Selling Texas Bourbon Whiskey My latest episode has two guests from Garrison Brothers Distillery […]

The post “My Favorite Mistake” Episode #11: Donnis Todd & Dan Garrison appeared first on Lean Blog.

 
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by LSSU Admin - Friday, 16 October 2020, 10:21 PM
Retrieved from: Lean Blog
Anyone in the world

Thanks as always to Ryan McCormick for this… Healthcare — Creating Value for Patients A nurse who was disciplined for using Facebook to criticize a health care system that cared for her grandfather has won an appeal after a 5-year ordeal.  Healthcare workers need to be able to advocate for loved ones and families without […]

The post Operational Excellence Mixtape: October 16, 2020 appeared first on Lean Blog.

 
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by LSSU Admin - Thursday, 15 October 2020, 12:20 PM
Retrieved from: Lean Blog
Anyone in the world

I'm excited that Episode #10 of my new podcast “My Favorite Mistake” is now released! You can listen to it and learn more via my MarkGraban.com website: Episode #10: Jane Wenning's “Favorite Mistake” About Sleep and Wellness Today's episode is a little different since our guest is a certified athletic trainer, Jane Wenning. But, sleep […]

The post “My Favorite Mistake” Episode #10: Jane Wenning appeared first on Lean Blog.

 
Anyone in the world

It’s fitting on the three month anniversary of the launch of my book Learning to Lead, Leading to Learn that I help celebrate the upcoming release of my friend, colleague, and fellow lean healthcare coach Arnout Orelio’s book Lean Thinking for Emerging Healthcare Leaders.  Read below to learn how Arnout is connected to my early […]

The post Interview with Arnout Orelio: Lean Thinking for Emerging Healthcare Leaders appeared first on Katie Anderson.

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Anyone in the world

I'm happy to be partnering with Value Capture to give away three paperback copies of A Playbook for Habitual Excellence, a collection of speeches by the late Paul O'Neill. Winners must have a U.S. mailing address. Click to enter Readers anywhere can download a free PDF of the book. You can also buy it in […]

The post Enter to Win One of 3 Copies of the Paul O’Neill “Playbook for Habitual Excellence” appeared first on Lean Blog.

 
Anyone in the world

My guest for Episode #388 is my friend Michael Lombard. I first met Michael when he lived in the DFW area and first got into healthcare. He has been a Lean facilitator / coach in numerous healthcare organizations and has been a hospital CEO in Louisiana before taking his current role, again focusing on process […]

The post Lean Podcast #388 — Michael Lombard on Kata, Crises, and his AME Conference Keynote appeared first on Lean Blog.

 
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by LSSU Admin - Tuesday, 13 October 2020, 4:46 PM
Retrieved from: The Lean Thinker
Anyone in the world
I was going through some old files and came across a pocket card we handed out back in 2003 or so. It was used in conjunction with our “how to walk the gemba” coaching sessions that we did with the lean staff, and then taught them to do with leaders. There is a pretty long …
 
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by LSSU Admin - Tuesday, 13 October 2020, 4:30 PM
Retrieved from: Kevin Meyer
Anyone in the world
As we approach the arbitrary end of the year, many organizations are beginning the planning cycle for next year.  Part of that process should be identifying what projects and activities should be stopped, for several reasons – performance, alignment with strategy, and so forth.  However, equally if not more important is creating a process (and […]